0.1 Emio Greco / PC

 


Emio Greco / PC are Emio Greco and Pieter C. Scholten. They are choreographers, and run a platform for dance in Amsterdam called ICKamsterdam. Recently they have also become directors of the Ballet National de Marseille.

The work of Emio Greco / PC has an intense physicality. For me particularly exciting about their movement material is the way it allows individual dancers to appear through sophisticated technical dance and set choreography.

In the interview-essay ‘Motivations for Movement’ I explore the movement material of Emio Greco / PC as experienced by two of their dancers; Victor Callens and Sawami Fukuoka.
My initial focus was on the movement material of the company rather than on particular performances, but, as proposed by Victor Callens, the performance ‘Extra Dry‘ has been discussed quite extensively.

What I almost ignore in ‘Motivation for Movement’ is the way in which the work of Emio Greco / PC is presented to their audiences. If you are interested in this subject you might want to have look at ‘Inside Movement Knowledge: Documentation Model of Extra Dry‘. It offers an extensive overview of how ‘Extra Dry’ came about in an ‘intertextual context’; ranging from interviews with Emio and Pieter, to the light plan of the performance and reviews in local Dutch newspapers.

Emio Greco is a dancer/choreographer coming from ballet. Pieter Scholten has a background in theater directing. Together they make their choreographies / performances.
In the conversations I had with Victor and Sawami, they most of the time refer to Emio and don’t talk so much about Pieter. This is because the focus of our conversations was on the movement material of the company, and that is coming from ‘Emio’s body’.


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The final scene of ‘Extra Dry’, picture Laurent Ziegler

On the website of ICKamsterdam you can find this sentence on the performance ‘Extra Dry‘:

‘The perfectly controlling mind, subjecting the body to the will of the dancer is confronted by the body’s resistance to obey.’

‘Motivations for Movement’, including the comparison between the work of Emio Greco / PC and Peter Levine’s ideas on trauma and trauma healing (part 4), can be seen as an elaboration on the subject of this ‘tension’, as it exists in the work of Emio Greco / PC and in human life.

Motivations for Movement

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